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I entries
Icarian Sea (ih-CAIR-ee-an). Body of water off the island of Crete, named after Icarus who fell here after soaring too near the sun on wings of feathers and wax.
Icarus (IK-uh-rus). Son of Daedalus who dared to fly too near the sun on wings of feathers and wax. Daedalus had been imprisoned by King Minos of Crete within the walls of his own invention, the Labyrinth. But the great craftsman's genius would not suffer captivity. He made two pairs of wings by adhering feathers to a wooden frame with wax. Giving one pair to his son, he cautioned him that flying too near the sun would cause the wax to melt. But Icarus became ecstatic with the ability to fly and forgot his father's warning. The feathers came loose and Icarus plunged to his death in the sea.
Io (EYE-oh). Priestess of Hera from Argos, who was transformed into a cow. Some say that Zeus became infatuated with Io and turned her into a heifer to hide her from his jealous wife Hera. Others say that Hera performed the transformation to protect her young priestess from Zeus. However that may be, Hera assigned the many-eyed Arcadian hero Argus to watch over Io. But Hermes, acting on Zeus's behalf, lulled Argus to sleep and decapitated him.
Iobates (eye-OB-uh-teez). King of Lycia who tried to do away with Bellerophon by sending him after the Chimaera. Bellerophon had been sent by King Proetus of Tiryns to deliver a letter to Iobates. Proetus's wife had turned her husband against the hero, so the letter requested that Iobates kill him. Iobates felt that the simplest way to honor this request was to challenge Bellerophon to slay the Chimaera.
Iolaus (eye-oh-LAY-us). Son of Iphicles who helped Heracles slay the Hydra. Iolaus was his uncle Heracles's charioteer. When in the course of one of his Labors the great hero sought the Hydra in the swamps of Lerna, Iolaus conveyed him there in his chariot. And when Heracles discovered that hacking off any one of the Hydra's multiple heads caused two more to grow in its place, Iolaus came to his rescue. Each time a head was lopped, he cauterized the monster's neck with a torch before the others could sprout.
Iolcus (eye-AWL-kus). Thessalian city from which Jason and the Argonauts set out after the Golden Fleece. Jason's father should have been king of Iolcus, but his brother Pelias had usurped the throne. So when Jason, who had been raised in the wilderness by Chiron the centaur, arrived in Iolcus and asserted his claim to the kingdom, Pelias sent him after the Golden Fleece to be rid of him.
Iphicles (IF-i-kleez). Brother of Heracles. Although they were twins, only Heracles was an immortal hero. It was understood that Iphicles was the son of Alcmene and her mortal husband, while Heracles was the son of Alcmene and Zeus. Iphicles was the father of Heracles' charioteer, Iolaus, who helped him slay the Hydra.
Ixion (iks-EYE-on). A king condemned to eternal punishment in Tartarus, chained to a fiery wheel. Ixion had thrown his father-in-law into a fiery pit and was purified of the crime by Zeus. But rather than be thankful for this divine favor, he tried to seduce Zeus's wife. Hera warned her husband what was afoot, and Zeus fashioned a cloud into Hera's likeness. Ixion made a pass at the cloud and was caught in the act. He was immediately consigned to the Underworld for punishment.
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I entries
Icarian Sea (ih-CAIR-ee-an). Body of water off the island of Crete, named after Icarus who fell here after soaring too near the sun on wings of feathers and wax.
Icarus (IK-uh-rus). Son of Daedalus who dared to fly too near the sun on wings of feathers and wax. Daedalus had been imprisoned by King Minos of Crete within the walls of his own invention, the Labyrinth. But the great craftsman's genius would not suffer captivity. He made two pairs of wings by adhering feathers to a wooden frame with wax. Giving one pair to his son, he cautioned him that flying too near the sun would cause the wax to melt. But Icarus became ecstatic with the ability to fly and forgot his father's warning. The feathers came loose and Icarus plunged to his death in the sea.
Io (EYE-oh). Priestess of Hera from Argos, who was transformed into a cow. Some say that Zeus became infatuated with Io and turned her into a heifer to hide her from his jealous wife Hera. Others say that Hera performed the transformation to protect her young priestess from Zeus. However that may be, Hera assigned the many-eyed Arcadian hero Argus to watch over Io. But Hermes, acting on Zeus's behalf, lulled Argus to sleep and decapitated him.
Iobates (eye-OB-uh-teez). King of Lycia who tried to do away with Bellerophon by sending him after the Chimaera. Bellerophon had been sent by King Proetus of Tiryns to deliver a letter to Iobates. Proetus's wife had turned her husband against the hero, so the letter requested that Iobates kill him. Iobates felt that the simplest way to honor this request was to challenge Bellerophon to slay the Chimaera.
Iolaus (eye-oh-LAY-us). Son of Iphicles who helped Heracles slay the Hydra. Iolaus was his uncle Heracles's charioteer. When in the course of one of his Labors the great hero sought the Hydra in the swamps of Lerna, Iolaus conveyed him there in his chariot. And when Heracles discovered that hacking off any one of the Hydra's multiple heads caused two more to grow in its place, Iolaus came to his rescue. Each time a head was lopped, he cauterized the monster's neck with a torch before the others could sprout.
Iolcus (eye-AWL-kus). Thessalian city from which Jason and the Argonauts set out after the Golden Fleece. Jason's father should have been king of Iolcus, but his brother Pelias had usurped the throne. So when Jason, who had been raised in the wilderness by Chiron the centaur, arrived in Iolcus and asserted his claim to the kingdom, Pelias sent him after the Golden Fleece to be rid of him.
Iphicles (IF-i-kleez). Brother of Heracles. Although they were twins, only Heracles was an immortal hero. It was understood that Iphicles was the son of Alcmene and her mortal husband, while Heracles was the son of Alcmene and Zeus. Iphicles was the father of Heracles' charioteer, Iolaus, who helped him slay the Hydra.
Ixion (iks-EYE-on). A king condemned to eternal punishment in Tartarus, chained to a fiery wheel. Ixion had thrown his father-in-law into a fiery pit and was purified of the crime by Zeus. But rather than be thankful for this divine favor, he tried to seduce Zeus's wife. Hera warned her husband what was afoot, and Zeus fashioned a cloud into Hera's likeness. Ixion made a pass at the cloud and was caught in the act. He was immediately consigned to the Underworld for punishment.
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