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G entries
Giants. Monstrous children of the goddess Earth; siblings of the Cyclopes and Titans. Some say that it was Zeus's overthrow of his father Cronus and the other Titans that caused the Giants to meditate revenge. They stormed Mount Olympus, hurling boulders and burning tree trunks. The Olympians were advised that they would go down in defeat unless aided by a mortal, so they called in Heracles and prevailed with the hero's aid.
Glaucus (GLAW-kus). Son of King Minos of Crete. So vast was Minos's palace of Knossos that when Glaucus turned up missing one day the king had to send for a visionary to locate him. The seer, Polyeidus, found the boy smothered in a jar of honey. Minos insisted that he restore Glaucus to life. This the seer accomplished, only to discover that instead of a reward Minos insisted he teach Glaucus all his mystical skills.
Goddess. One name by which we of modern times identify the feminine supreme power worshipped by early humankind.
Golden Fleece. The wooly coat of a magical flying ram, sought by Jason and the Argonauts. The ram had carried off Phrixus and his sister Helle when they were on the point of being sacrificed, and it flew as far as Colchis on the Black Sea. Here Phrixus was welcomed by King Aeetes, and the Golden Fleece was hung in the sacred grove of the war god Ares.
Gorgons (GOR-gunz or GOR-gonz). Monstrous sisters with snakes for hair, tusks like boars and lolling tongues. The only mortal one of the three was Medusa. She had the power of turning to stone whoever looked at her, or whomever she looked at (the myth can be interpreted both ways). The hero Perseus, defending his mother from the unwanted advances of King Polydectes of Seriphos, swore to bring him Medusa's head.
Graeae (GREE-ee). Two (or three) sisters, variously described as hags or swan-like from birth. In any case, they had but one eye and one tooth in common.
Great Goddess. One name by which we of modern times identify the feminine supreme power worshipped by early humankind.
Great Mother. Another name by which we of modern times identify the feminine supreme power worshipped by early humankind.
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G entries
Giants. Monstrous children of the goddess Earth; siblings of the Cyclopes and Titans. Some say that it was Zeus's overthrow of his father Cronus and the other Titans that caused the Giants to meditate revenge. They stormed Mount Olympus, hurling boulders and burning tree trunks. The Olympians were advised that they would go down in defeat unless aided by a mortal, so they called in Heracles and prevailed with the hero's aid.
Glaucus (GLAW-kus). Son of King Minos of Crete. So vast was Minos's palace of Knossos that when Glaucus turned up missing one day the king had to send for a visionary to locate him. The seer, Polyeidus, found the boy smothered in a jar of honey. Minos insisted that he restore Glaucus to life. This the seer accomplished, only to discover that instead of a reward Minos insisted he teach Glaucus all his mystical skills.
Goddess. One name by which we of modern times identify the feminine supreme power worshipped by early humankind.
Golden Fleece. The wooly coat of a magical flying ram, sought by Jason and the Argonauts. The ram had carried off Phrixus and his sister Helle when they were on the point of being sacrificed, and it flew as far as Colchis on the Black Sea. Here Phrixus was welcomed by King Aeetes, and the Golden Fleece was hung in the sacred grove of the war god Ares.
Gorgons (GOR-gunz or GOR-gonz). Monstrous sisters with snakes for hair, tusks like boars and lolling tongues. The only mortal one of the three was Medusa. She had the power of turning to stone whoever looked at her, or whomever she looked at (the myth can be interpreted both ways). The hero Perseus, defending his mother from the unwanted advances of King Polydectes of Seriphos, swore to bring him Medusa's head.
Graeae (GREE-ee). Two (or three) sisters, variously described as hags or swan-like from birth. In any case, they had but one eye and one tooth in common.
Great Goddess. One name by which we of modern times identify the feminine supreme power worshipped by early humankind.
Great Mother. Another name by which we of modern times identify the feminine supreme power worshipped by early humankind.
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