Book Thirteen

When Odysseus has finished his tale, the king orders him sped to Ithaca. A rug is spread on the deck of the ship, and he sleeps the whole way.

The sailors put him down on the beach still sleeping, together with the magnificent gifts of the Phaeacians. Upon awakening he spends a good deal of time wondering how he is going to protect this treasure.

Athena casts a protective mist about him that keeps him from recognizing his homeland. Finally the goddess reveals herself and dispells the mist. In joy Odysseus kisses the ground.

Athena transforms him into an old man as a disguise. Clad in a filthy tunic, he goes off to find his faithful swineherd, as instructed by the goddess.

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NOTES

tale Odysseus tells his audience that there's no point continuing the tale past his arrival on Calypso's island since he'd recounted that episode the night before. But the previous evening's narration had begun at the departure from Troy, so in fact he hadn't mentioned anything about Calypso. Such minor mistakes on Homer's part gave rise in classical times to the expression "even Homer sometimes nods". (back)

Book number: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 - 17 - 18 - 19 - 20 - 21 - 22 - 23 - 24